We found 124 mental health professionals near Iron Mountain, MI.

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David B. Vanholla MD
Specializes in Psychiatry
Average rating 4.5 stars out of 5 (4 ratings)
Address: 500 Stephenson Avenue, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Dr. Karen Ann Olson PH.D.
Specializes in Psychology
Address: 216 East Ludington Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Angela Kay Bjorne LMSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
Janet Whedon LMSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
Deanna Jeanne Brown
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
Dr. Elizabeth Marguarite Stanczak PH.D.
Specializes in Psychology
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Lottie Kohtala CAADC, MSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Ms. Jane Marie Moker MS
Specializes in Counseling
Address: 1201 Jackson Street, Niagara, WI 54151
Melissa Lee Gauthier MSW, LCSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 440 Woodward Avenue, Kingsford, MI 49801
Deborah J. Gross CSW, MSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Lisa Marie Duca RN
Specializes in Psychiatry
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
Dr. Todd Russell Silverstein PSY.D.
Specializes in Addiction Therapy, Group Therapy, Neuropsychology, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Psychology
Average rating 4.75 stars out of 5 (1 rating)
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Rebbecca Lynne Jones LLMSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Dr. Lynda Kay Wargolet PSY.D.
Specializes in Psychology
Address: 325 East H Street, Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Ann Heather Mattson RN
Specializes in Psychiatry
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
Lauren Jane Bal LBSW
Specializes in Social Work
Address: 715 Pyle Drive, Kingsford, MI 49802
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What is Mental Health Care?

Mental health care refers to a broad group of professionals who work to keep people mentally well. Just as physical illness can cause unwanted aches and pains, mental illness can cause unwanted thoughts, behaviors, and feelings. Even people who are not dealing with a mental illness can suffer from the effects of a stressful situation and find it difficult to cope. Mental health care workers seek to improve the emotional, psychological, and social well-being of their clients, usually through therapy.

There are many kinds of mental health care providers. Some examples include psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors, psychiatric nurses, substance abuse professionals, and social workers. Mental health workers treat patients at all stages of life and through many common problems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and several others.

Some of the symptoms that occur with mental health issues and may cause a person to seek treatment include:
  • Changes in eating or sleeping
  • Decreased energy, fatigue
  • Numbness or a lack of interest in life
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Recurrent, persistent thoughts
  • Feeling unusually anxious, sad, angry, worried, or on edge
  • An inability to care for one’s self or perform daily tasks

Patients seeking mental health treatment have several options. The most widely used treatment is psychotherapy, also called talk therapy or simply ‘therapy’. In therapy, mental health workers guide patients as they talk about issues in their life and problem-solve ways to make positive, healthy changes. Some patients also take medication to treat mental illness. Medications are especially effective at treating the chemical imbalances behind more severe cases of depression, anxiety, and illnesses such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Many mental illnesses are treated with a combination of both medication and therapy. For example, in substance abuse care, medications to ease withdrawal symptoms are commonly used together with a specific kind of therapy called behavior therapy, which teaches patients how to handle challenging situations without drugs or alcohol. Mental health workers may also consult with physicians or use community resources to help patients function at their best.
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