We found 4 providers with an interest in radical prostatectomy and who accept Humana HMO near Kingwood, TX.

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Paul R. Kenworthy MD
Specializes in Urology
average rating 4.42 stars (10 ratings)
350 Kingwood Medical Drive; Suite 140
Kingwood, TX
 

Dr. Paul Kenworthy practices urology (urinary tract disease) in Shenandoah, TX, Kingwood, TX, and Huntsville, TX. Patients rated him highly, giving him an average of 4.5 stars out of 5. Clinical interests for Dr. Kenworthy include robotic radical prostatectomy. Blue Cross Blue Shield Bronze, Blue Cross Blue Shield Gold, and United Healthcare Choice are among the insurance carriers that Dr. Kenworthy takes. He graduated from the University of Texas Medical School at Houston and Ohio State University College of Medicine and then he performed his residency at a hospital affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Dr. Kenworthy is affiliated with Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital.

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Relevant Interests: , robotic radical prostatectomy

All Interests: Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

Michael F. Graham Jr. MD
Specializes in Urology
average rating 4.3 stars (21 ratings)
350 Kingwood Medical Drive; Suite 140
Kingwood, TX
 

Dr. Michael Graham specializes in urology (urinary tract disease) and practices in The Woodlands, TX, Conroe, TX, and Kingwood, TX. Dr. Graham is rated 4.5 stars out of 5 by his patients. He has indicated that his clinical interests include robotic radical prostatectomy. He honors several insurance carriers, including Blue Cross Blue Shield Bronze, Blue Cross Blue Shield Gold, and United Healthcare Choice. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Graham's training includes a residency program at a hospital affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. His hospital/clinic affiliations include Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital and Houston Northwest Medical Center.

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Relevant Interests: , robotic radical prostatectomy

All Interests: Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

Matthew M. Hogan MD
Specializes in Urology
average rating 3.55 stars (5 ratings)
22999 Highway 59 N 200
Kingwood, TX
 

Dr. Matthew Hogan is an urologist. After completing medical school at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Dr. Hogan performed his residency at a hospital affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. In his practice, he is particularly interested in robotic radical prostatectomy. He has a 3.5 out of 5 star average patient rating. He takes several insurance carriers, including Blue Cross Blue Shield Bronze, Blue Cross Blue Shield Gold, and United Healthcare Choice. Dr. Hogan is affiliated with Tomball Regional Medical Center (TRMC) and Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital.

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Relevant Interests: , robotic radical prostatectomy

All Interests: Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

Liliana Woo MD
Specializes in Urology
average rating 3.67 stars (13 ratings)
22999 Highway 59 N 200
Kingwood, TX
 

Dr. Liliana Woo's medical specialty is urology (urinary tract disease). Her clinical interests include robotic radical prostatectomy. Patients gave her an average rating of 3.5 stars out of 5. Dr. Woo takes Blue Cross Blue Shield Bronze, Blue Cross Blue Shield Gold, and United Healthcare Choice, as well as other insurance carriers. She obtained her medical school training at Harvard Medical School and performed her residency at a hospital affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Dr. Woo is professionally affiliated with Tomball Regional Medical Center (TRMC) and Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital.

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Relevant Interests: , robotic radical prostatectomy

All Interests: Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

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What is Radical Prostatectomy?

Prostate cancer is uncommon in men under 40, but the risk of getting the disease significantly increases after the age of 50. If your doctor suspects you have prostate cancer based on a physical exam or blood test results, she may recommend a biopsy. This diagnostic procedure collects tiny samples of tissue from the prostate, typically with the use of a special needle. The samples are then examined in a laboratory to determine whether any abnormal cells are present. Biopsies of the prostate are most often done transrectally, or through the rectum.

If your biopsy shows that you have prostate cancer, your doctor will discuss available options with you, such as watchful waiting, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Together, you will develop a treatment plan that best fits your condition. If your doctor recommends surgery, you will likely have a radical prostatectomy. There are three ways this prostate removal procedure can be performed:

  • Open radical prostatectomy, which uses a large incision, usually in your abdomen.
  • Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, which requires several small incisions in your stomach. A long, thin tube with a camera is inserted through one of the cuts. Your surgeon uses this instrument to view the inside of your belly during the operation.
  • Robotic radical prostatectomy, which uses the above laparoscopic techniques but with the help of a robot.
While incisions for the laparoscopic and robotic approaches will always be on the lower abdomen, there are two possible incision locations for the open procedure. More commonly, the cut will start just below the belly button and end at the pubic bone. The other possible but less frequently used incision location is the area between the base of your scrotum and anus. After the cut is made, your surgeon will separate the prostate from the tissues surrounding it. Extra care will be taken to cause as little injury as possible to the blood vessels and nerves. You will wake up from surgery with a small pouch that drains fluids from your belly and a long tube that drains urine from your bladder.

Radical prostatectomy is recommended for cancer that is contained within the prostate. If cancer has spread to other parts of the body, non-surgical treatments like chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy may be more appropriate.

The average hospital stay is one day for a laparoscopic or robotic radical prostatectomy, and one to three days for an open radical prostatectomy. You will be advised to stay in bed until the morning following your operation. Strenuous activities like running and heavy lifting must be avoided for four to six weeks. Although radical prostatectomy aims to remove all of your cancer cells, you will still need to see your doctor regularly after surgery to make sure that the cancer does not return.

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