We found 7 addiction providers near Burlington, VT.

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Specializes in Addiction Psychiatry
 

Dr. John Hammel is a physician who specializes in addiction psychiatry. Dr. Hammel takes Medicare insurance. He attended medical school at Tufts University School of Medicine. He trained at Faulkner Hospital for his residency. He is professionally affiliated with White River Junction VA Medical Center.

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Specializes in Addiction Medicine, Psychiatry
118 Pine Street
Burlington, VT
 

Dr. William Grass specializes in addiction medicine and psychiatry and practices in Burlington, VT and Bellows Falls, VT. He accepts Medicare insurance. He attended the University of Vermont College of Medicine for medical school and subsequently trained at the University of Vermont/Fletcher Allen Health Care for residency.

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Specializes in Family Medicine, Addiction Medicine, Internal Medicine
617 Riverside Avenue; Suite 200
Burlington, VT
 

Dr. John Brooklyn is a family medicine physician and addiction medicine specialist. Dr. Brooklyn honors Medicaid and Medicare insurance. He studied medicine at Brown University, Alpert Medical School. He speaks French.

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Specializes in Addiction Psychiatry, Geriatric Psychiatry
1 South Prospect Street; St. Joseph's 6
Burlington, VT
 

Dr. Arthur Warwick is a specialist in addiction psychiatry and geriatric psychiatry. He works in Burlington, VT and Burlingon, VT. Dr. Warwick's education and training includes medical school at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and residency at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences/National Capital Consortium.

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Specializes in Addiction Psychiatry
1 South Prospect St Ohc; 3 Stop #482
Burlington, VT
 

Dr. John Hughes is a specialist in addiction psychiatry. He works in Burlington, VT. He studied medicine at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine.

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Specializes in Addiction Psychiatry, Addiction Medicine
118 Pine Street
Burlington, VT
 

Dr. Suzanne Parker's medical specialty is addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. Dr. Parker graduated from the University of Vermont College of Medicine.

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Specializes in Addiction Medicine, Psychiatry
188 Allen Brook Lane
Williston, VT
 

Dr. Marjorie Carsen's areas of specialization are addiction medicine and psychiatry; she sees patients in Williston, VT. Dr. Carsen studied medicine at SUNY Downstate Medical Center College of Medicine.

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What is Addiction?

The recreational use of alcohol or drugs can sometimes become so compulsive for a user that it causes physical changes to the body and brain. When people are addicted to a substance, they may want to stop using because of the harmful effects but are unable to do so on their own. Addiction recovery involves medical and psychological help to break free from an addiction.

There are generally three broad steps or phases of addiction recovery. First, detoxification removes the harmful substance from the body. This step can be difficult physically, depending on the substance and level of addiction, and in some cases it can even be life-threatening. Medical care and support are important to help patients through the uncomfortable side effects of detox.

The second step is treatment, which may involve several different kinds of psychotherapy and counseling, medication, or both. The most commonly used forms of therapy are cognitive-behavioral therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and motivational interview therapy. Goals of treatment generally include developing coping skills outside of substance use, identifying what caused the substance abuse in the first place, and repairing relationships. Medications such as methadone, naltrexone, or nicotine replacement help to relieve cravings and curb the physical effects of withdrawal.

The final phase of addiction recovery is maintenance or relapse prevention. Addiction is a chronic disease and treatment will be long-term. So while care at this stage may not be as frequent or intense as during the first two stages, in order to be successful, it needs to be in place.

Addiction is a very difficult disease that takes a huge toll on patients and their loved ones. Treating addiction can be challenging but also incredibly rewarding. Addiction specialists provide hope to those caught in a cycle they cannot escape without help.