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We found 5 providers matching cardioversion and who accept Affinity Health Plan near White Plains, NY.

Showing 1-5 of 5
Dr. Jose Maria Dizon, MD
Specializes in Adult Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology
222 Westchester Avenue
White Plains, NY
 

Dr. Jose Dizon practices adult cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology (heart rhythm). These areas are among Dr. Dizon's clinical interests: electrophysiological (EP) study and pacemaker. He takes Aetna EPO, POMCO, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and more. Before performing his residency at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and a hospital affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical College, Dr. Dizon attended Yale School of Medicine. Awards and/or distinctions Dr. Dizon has received include One of America's Top Doctors; Graduated Summa cum Laude, University of Pennsylvania; and Phi Beta Kappa. He is conversant in Spanish. He is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital and ColumbiaDoctors. Dr. Dizon is open to new patients.

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Clinical Interests: Pacemaker, Electrophysiological Study

2013 Procedure Details

  • Medicare Volume: 31
  • Uninsured Cost: $750
  • Medicare Cost: $132
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Dr. David Albert Rubin, MD
Specializes in Adult Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology
222 Westchester Avenue
White Plains, NY
 

Dr. David Rubin is an adult cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology (heart rhythm) specialist in New York, NY and White Plains, NY. Patients gave him an average rating of 5.0 stars out of 5. Clinical interests for Dr. Rubin include holter monitoring, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), and cardioversion. Dr. Rubin is in-network for Aetna EPO, POMCO, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and more. He attended Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons and then went on to complete his residency at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. He has received distinctions including One of America's Top Doctors; phi beta kappa (Brown University), alpha omega alpha (Columbia University); and fellow american college of cardiology. Dr. Rubin is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital and ColumbiaDoctors. He welcomes new patients.

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Relevant Interests: , cardioversion

All Interests: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Problems, Catheter Ablation, Arrhythmias, Electrophysiological Study, ... (Read more)

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Dr. Carmine Anthony Sorbera, MD
Specializes in Adult Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology
19 Bradhurst Avenue; Suite 700
Hawthorne, NY
 

Dr. Carmine Sorbera is an adult cardiologist and cardiac electrophysiologist. He has a special interest in pacemaker and atrial fibrillation. Dr. Sorbera has a 4.5 out of 5 star average patient rating. He accepts Aetna EPO, POMCO, and Blue Cross/Blue Shield, as well as other insurance carriers. He attended New York Medical College and then went on to complete his residency at Westchester Medical Center. Dr. Sorbera has received the following distinctions: One of America's Top Doctors and Rated one of New York Magazine's Best Doctors. His hospital/clinic affiliations include NewYork-Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital, ColumbiaDoctors, and Northern Westchester Hospital (NWH). He welcomes new patients.

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Clinical Interests: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Problems, Pacemaker, Arrhythmias, Electrophysiological Study

2013 Procedure Details

  • Medicare Volume: 11
  • Uninsured Cost: $653
  • Medicare Cost: $132
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Dr. Daniel Yu-Chuan Wang, MD
Specializes in Adult Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology
222 Westchester Avenue
White Plains, NY
 

Dr. Daniel Wang, who practices in New York, NY, White Plains, NY, and Suffern, NY, is a medical specialist in adult cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology (heart rhythm). Before completing his residency at a hospital affiliated with Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Wang attended medical school at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Wang is especially interested in cardioversion, syncope (fainting), and catheter ablation. Aetna EPO, POMCO, and Blue Cross/Blue Shield are among the insurance carriers that Dr. Wang honors. Dr. Wang (or staff) speaks the following foreign languages: Mandarin and Spanish. His professional affiliations include NewYork-Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital and ColumbiaDoctors. His practice is open to new patients.

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Relevant Interests: , cardioversion

All Interests: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Problems, Catheter Ablation, Tachycardia, Arrhythmias, ... (Read more)

2013 Procedure Details

  • Medicare Volume: 23
  • Uninsured Cost: $750
  • Medicare Cost: $132
Hospitals affiliated with provider +
Dr. John Devens Fisher, MD
Specializes in Adult Cardiology, Cardiac Electrophysiology
200 South Broadway
Tarrytown, NY
 

Dr. John Fisher works as a cardiologist and cardiac electrophysiologist. Amerigroup, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and Empire BlueCross BlueShield are among the insurance carriers that Dr. Fisher accepts. His education and training includes medical school at Wayne State University School of Medicine and residency at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Boston Medical Center, and Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Fisher (or staff) speaks the following foreign languages: Hebrew, Spanish, and Korean. Dr. Fisher is professionally affiliated with North Central Bronx Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center - Weiler Division Hospital, and Montefiore Medical Center - Moses Division Hospital.

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Clinical Interests: Pacemaker, Cardiac Imaging

2013 Procedure Details

  • Medicare Volume: 18
  • Uninsured Cost: $1,000
  • Medicare Cost: $134
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What is Cardioversion?

Cardioversion is treatment for an irregular heartbeat, called arrhythmia. Arrhythmias happen when the delicate internal electrical system of the heart stops working correctly. For example, in atrial fibrillation the heart muscle makes short, fast, quivering movements instead of contracting. When the heart beats out of rhythm, it does not pump blood effectively, which can be dangerous. Cardioversion restores a normal heartbeat using electrical stimulation or medications.

When electrical stimulation is delivered from outside the body, the procedure is called external cardioversion. External cardioversion is performed when a person’s heart is beating so poorly that serious damage is likely to occur without intervention. It may be done as either an elective procedure or in an emergency situation. If done as an elective procedure, the patient would receive the treatment during a scheduled appointment with his or her physician. The patient is given blood thinners to reduce the risk of blood clots, as well as sedatives to help keep him or her comfortable. Two electrical paddles or electrode patches are applied to the chest, and sometimes also to the back. A quick electrical shock is applied, which resets the beating of the heart. It may take more than one shock. The whole procedure takes less than 30 minutes, and recovery is quick. The heart is carefully monitored for the next 24 – 48 hours to make sure it is beating correctly.

Electrical stimulation may also be delivered from inside the heart. This type of treatment is called internal cardioversion. During internal cardioversion, the shock is given via catheter, or a thin, flexible tube, that is inserted in a vein in the leg and threaded to the heart. The patient is asleep during the procedure. The electrical shock from internal cardioversion is much smaller compared to the shock from external cardioversion.

Cardioversion may also be administered in the form of medications, called anti-arrhythmics. These medications alter the flow of electricity through the heart, which can help it contract effectively. Anti-arrhythmics may be given by mouth at home or through an IV in the hospital. In both cases, the heart is carefully monitored to make sure the treatment is working.

If cardioversion is unsuccessful, an implantable device such as a pacemaker or ICD may be used. These small devices are placed under the skin of the chest, and they use a battery and small wires to keep the heart beating on time.